‘Programmata’ and Political Campaigns

Programmata were painted political campaign notices in the ancient Roman empire. These were a common sight in Pompeii in its heyday, and provide us an invaluable insight into the intricacies of Roman and specifically Pompeiian politics at the time of Mount Vesuvius’ eruption. In a study of over 1,500 programmata, 128 were found to give names of candidates for various (and sometimes more than one) political office (Viitanen & Nissin, 2017).

Sources & Further Reading:
Viitanen, E.-M., & Nissin, L. (2017). Campaigning for votes in ancient Pompeii: Contextualizing electoral programmata. In Berti, I., Bolle, K., Opdenhoff, F., & Stroth, F. (Ed.), Writing Matters (pp. 117-144). De Gruyter. https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110534597-006
Campbell, V. (2016, September 9). Initialising. Pompeiian connections: Networks in Pompeii and the Roman world. https://pompeiinetworks.wordpress.com/2016/09/09/initialising/
Flashback Journey to Pompeii. (2017, July 24). Politics and election campaigns in Pompeii. Flashback journey to Pompeii. http://journeytopompeiiblog.weebly.com/blog/politics-and-election-campaigns-in-pompeii
Berry, J. (2007). The complete Pompeii. Thames and Hudson.
Instagram image: Campbell, V. (2016, September 9). Initialising. Pompeiian connections: Networks in Pompeii and the Roman world. https://pompeiinetworks.wordpress.com/2016/09/09/initialising/

Published by colloquialisthistory

Sarah is a historian with a BA in History from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She mostly focuses on European and religious history, but also enjoys branching out to the rest of the world. She is currently pursuing a Masters in Library and Information Science at San Jose State University, with an end-goal of expanding digital archives (like this one!) to be as open-access and as widely available as possible.

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